Home

Latest Posts

Tohoku Story: Returning the Favor

After the disaster in 2011, CRASH worked with a baseball team from Tsukuba (Ibaraki prefecture) to bring equipment to a team in Onagawa (Miyagi prefecture) that lost everything in the tsunami. A year later, when a tornado hit Tsukuba, the team from Onagawa was able to help out and return the favor. See the touching story in this video.

Returning the Favor / 恩返し from CRASH Japan on Vimeo.

Tohoku Stories: Serving through Tradition

With all of the gifted volunteers willing to serve in Japan, CRASH Japan is sometimes able to channel unique talents and skill sets into their outreach events. One volunteer, Yukiko Hirano, has practiced Japanese tea ceremony for over 40 years. She was delighted to have the opportunity to serve survivors of the great earthquake and tsunami, who are now living in temporary housing.Hirano-san sees many similarities between Japanese tea ceremony and the Christian faith. The cloth that goes around the waist of the person performing the ceremony is much like the cloth Christ wore around his waist when he washed the feet of his disciples. It is meant to signify servanthood, and a position of humility.In this special volunteer portrait video, you can see the beauty and grace of Hirano-san’s art. Your prayer and donations continue to make it possible for CRASH to connect with survivors in a meaningful way. Thank you for the support.

TROUBLE IN PARADISE: CHILDREN IN DETENTION IN BALI

Bali Detention CenterWorld Relief Indonesia has been implementing a psychosocial support project to serve asylum seekers/refugees in a detention center in Bali. In 2013, there were at least 120 asylum seekers from various countries such as Afghanistan, Iran, Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Turkey being detained there. The definition ofasylum seeker applies to all people fleeing persecution in their country, adults and children. Children are one of the most vulnerable groups of asylum seekers. They are subject to multiple, serious stressors. These include dealing with the behavioral and psychological distress in adults, dislocation from protective social groups and structures, witnessing violence and self-harm, and separation from important relational attachments. These stressors have incredible negative impacts such as: depression, stress-related medical conditions, and delayed growth and development. They can also manifest themselves in violence.

Three days of training by Jonathan and Rie Wilson on October 2013 has improved the capacity of World Relief Indonesia’s Refugee Team in providing psychosocial support for the asylum seeker children. We were equipped to run the five-day camp in the detention center where we have been serving these children by providing opportunities for education, self-expression, and play.

The parents of these twenty-three children commented that they had never seen their children so happy ever since they were detained.

Due to the regulations, facility and the various cultural backgrounds in the detention center, World Relief had to make a few adaptations to the original format. But the team of seven staff and volunteers managed to run the camp without any significant difficulty on the third week of December 2013. The impact, thankfully, was encouraging and heartwarming. The parents of these twenty-three children commented that they had never seen their children so happy ever since they were detained. The team also witnessed the children’s positive behavioral changes after the camp ended.

The following story was written by one of the staff who took part in the OpSAFE camp:

Omar* is such an adorable 5 year old boy from Iran. His chubby face is cutely framed with his light blue framed eyeglasses that he has been wearing for a couple of years. Although he is big for his age, he is the gentlest and the most polite boy in the detention center. Omar and his family–father, mother, a twin sister with cerebral palsy, uncle and aunty, have been in the detention center for over 3 months now, and they will still be detained until further notice. They are trying to get refugee status so that they could be resettled in Australia.

When I first met Omar, he was so shy that he did not even mention his name. He was hiding himself behind his father. I could tell that he was curious about me and other World Relief staff, as he kept on peeping at us and trying to hold his smile when I smiled at him. From then on, every time I approached him, if his parents were not around, he would retreat to his room. Omar and I never had a moment of talking or playing together like the other kids in the detention center until December 2013.

After getting trained to run 5 days activity of “Child Trauma Healing Intervention” on October 2013, the staff team and I were excited to implement what we had learnt. We were really encouraged in providing emotional care to children in the detention center who are traumatized by the violence in their home country, the rough journey and transition, as well as the limiting and, often time, harsh environment in the detention center. I was in charge of a group leader in which Omar was a part of.

During the first two days, Omar would not want to join the group if his father was not there with him. He would run out of the class or the activity to his room looking for his father when he lost sight of him. Although I encouraged him to stay with his friends in the classroom, he would politely say that he needed to look for his father. That was the sign that he did not yet have the trust in his friends and me as crew leader, and that was something that I was ready to handle because it was mentioned on the training. Getting the children’s trust is something we would like to achieve in order to be able to provide them emotional care.

On the third day of the activity, I was surprised to see that Omar would come out of his room without his father when I called him out. He also grabbed my hand when we walk together to the classroom, for the very first time. When his father had to attend an interview with UNHCR, he stayed calmly in the class throughout the day. I was so surprised as much as I was so grateful about it.

What we taught during the five days activity: You are not Alone! Everyone is Important! Follow and Believe! Be Strong and Courageous! and You are Loved! seemed to impress the children’s heart. We prayed together, played and ate together and the kids have grown their trust for us. We are thankful to be able to improve our capacity to love and help the children in the detention center.

*For security reasons, the name of the child has been changed.

LET’S HELP 1000 CHILDREN!

IN APRIL AND MAY WE ARE GOING TO HELP 1000 CHILDREN RECOVER FROM TRAUMA IN THE PHILIPPINES!

Recovering from disaster is hard enough for adults, can you imagine what it can feel like for a child? Research shows that untreated childhood trauma leads to a higher risk of social, neuropsychiatric and other medical problems. Yet most of the children affected by Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) have no access to psychological care. Without care, a whole generation is in danger or being lost to depression, PTSD, teenage pregnancy, adolescent drug abuse, school failure, victimization, anti-social behaviour and other long-term effects of trauma.

BUT WE ARE GOING TO DO SOMETHING TO HELP!

Over the next two months we are going to hold OperationSAFE camps in six towns in the typhoon affected region of Samar. Each camp will serve around 150-180 children who went through Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan). Through the camp they will receive primary emotional first-aid and screening for more severe problems. These will be just the beginning as afterwards smaller camps will be held in barangays (villages) around each town.

April 1-5 Balangkayan
April 21-25 Hernani
April 28- May 2nd Lawa’an
May 6-10 Balangiga
May 20-24 Giporlos
May 27-31 Quinapondan

WHAT WE NEED NOW IS FOR YOU TO BE INVOLVED!

We would like people from around the world to adopt one of these camps and show them that truly “You are Not Alone!” Please take a few moments and make a donation to support one of these camps. Each camp costs roughly $5,000 or $30 per child. Write the name of the camp in the comment field and we will send you details on how you can encourage your sponsored children through letters.

From Facebook…

一日温泉でゆっくりして、皆さん、仮設住宅にに帰っていかれました。お交わりの中で、震災時のお話を聴かせて頂きました。まだまだ、支援が必要です。

Spending a relaxing time at hot spring, they went back to the temporary housings.
... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago  ·  

View on Facebook

Residents at temporary housings arrived at hot spring called 'Tsukasa no Yu" in Kumamoto. つかさの湯に到着しました。 ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago  ·  

View on Facebook

大型バスで、住民の方々と温泉に向かいます。バスの中では、YMCAのボランティアの方がゲームをして下さっています。 ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago  ·  

View on Facebook